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Thanks for stopping in... We’re a small Mexican folk art store located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We personally choose ALL of our hand made pieces from talented artisans all over the great country of Mexico.

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Zinnia Blog

11.26
2017

A Shiny and Glittery Mexican Folk Art Christmas

These items were in our shop in 2013! So most of them are long gone but click on the photos or here to take you to our current Christmas collection...

 

Mexican folk art Guadelupes

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11.26
2017

Nativity Scenes or "Nacimientos" from Mexico and Peru

Posted by Anne Damon in Christmas, Religious folk art   /   LEAVE A COMMENT
Nativity Scenes or "Nacimientos" from Mexico and Peru-Zinnia Folk Arts
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11.22
2017

Frida Kahlo Christmas Ornament

Posted by Anne Damon in Christmas, Frida Kahlo   /   3 COMMENTS

This is a beautiful blown glass ornament depicting Mexico's most famous woman artist, Frida Kahlo. She led a turbulent and creative life and has likely exceeded the popularity of Diego Rivera and many other men of her time. She's inspired many women and if you're interested to learn more, check out some other blog posts we've written about her fashion style and 5 surprising facts about her life. The ornament was designed in Tucson, Arizona and then hand-blown and hand-painted in Krakow, Poland. It measures about 9" tall and adds a little life to any Christmas tree. We have a limited supply every year so don't miss out, purchase today!

Click on the photo or on the highlighted text to purchase. 

Frida Kahlo Christmas Ornament
11.11
2017

Where to Buy Mexican Christmas Ornaments

Posted by Anne Damon in Christmas   /   LEAVE A COMMENT

Mexican Christmas ornaments can be found in many places in Mexico, during the Christmas season, including Mexico City, Guerrero, Chiapas, Guanajuato, Oaxaca, Guadalajara and Puebla.  And of course in our Mexican folk art store starting in early November!  Because I select everything individually rather than buying at trade shows or from catalogues, I usually don't see Christmas ornaments to purchase in Mexico until late October. But keep your eyes open if you are traveling in Mexico at any time of the year because you'll be surprised to see unique small items that can be turned into ornaments even if that was not the artist's intention. 

One of the most common materials used for Mexican Christmas ornaments is tin. We always have a good selection of tin ornaments in various shapes and sizes. Some, like these, are simply cut and painted and others are cut, punched, fabricated and painted:

Click on the photo to take you to our current stock

Mexican Christmas Ornaments-Zinnia Folk Arts

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11.01
2017

Roundup of Past Day of the Dead Posts

Posted by Anne Damon in Day of the Dead   /   LEAVE A COMMENT

Day of the Dead is coming soon and in many places in Mexico, people are preparing for this special holiday. Today I thought I'd link you up to the posts I've done in the past about the amazing and beautiful holiday, Día de los Muertos. This is a roundup of old posts, so remember that the links are likely not working on the photos if the pieces have sold.

If you are interested in our current inventory of Day of the Dead folk art check here.

Day of the Dead Matadors

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10.31
2017

The "Panteon" or Cemetery on Day of the Dead

Posted by Anne Damon in Day of the Dead   /   LEAVE A COMMENT

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The cemeteries of Mexico differ from those in the United States in terms of color, order, and organization but on Day of the Dead they are like nothing else in the world. The photo above was taken at the cemetery in San Miguel de Allende. Families gather to clean and decorate the graves, they visit with friends and relatives, mariachi bands are playing and the color and joy of the anticipated arrival of the spirits is palpable.  They have prepared the foods and favorite drinks, they've decorated their ofrenda at home, they've set out the photos, the glass of water to quench the thirst of the returning spirit and they will return to their own home to welcome those spirits to their ofrenda.

Later that night they will return to the cemetery, light the candles and stay overnight to commune with the spirits who have now returned, along the paths of marigolds, to their resting place.

 

10.27
2017

Build a Day of the Dead Ofrenda to Honor your Departed Loved Ones

Posted by Anne Damon in Day of the Dead, Paper Folk Art, Paper Mache   /   LEAVE A COMMENT
Day of the Dead Art OfrendaAre you unsure about how to build an ofrenda for the upcoming Days of the Dead? Ofrendas are shrines built to remember and honor people who have died. They are a way to keep the memory of that person alive through the annual tradition of remembering what they loved to do, eat, drink and look like. The idea is to build a 
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10.26
2017

What is a Day of the Dead Catrina?

Posted by Anne Damon in Day of the Dead   /   LEAVE A COMMENT

Day of the Dead Catrina

This is a catrina. It's a figure of a woman skeleton usually dressed in a nice dress with a large plumed hat. A male skeleton is called a "catrin." And why are they so prevalent during the Days of the Dead?   read more
10.08
2017

What's the Difference between Day of the Dead and Halloween?

Posted by Anne Damon in Day of the Dead   /   1 COMMENTS
  Do you know anyone who says, "Day of the Dead is like Halloween in Mexico, right?" 
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08.31
2017

What is a Mexican Tree of Life?

Posted by Anne Damon in Mexican ceramics, Religious Folk Art   /   LEAVE A COMMENT

This blog post was copied with kind permission from Dyana Garza Levin of the Copal Store in San Jose del Cabo. I thank her for compiling information in a way that is easy to understand and comprehensive! I’ve taken the liberty of editing it very slightly and adding a few links but the structure and important points are Dyana’s.

“A Mexican Tree of Life is a hand coiled pottery sculpture depicting the biblical Tree of Life: traditionally the tree sculpture would include Adam and Eve with the tempting Serpent, but the themes have evolved over time and today it is common to find Trees of Life conveying subject matter such as Day of the Dead and the Folk Art of Mexico.

Tree of Life, Aurelio Flores, Zinnia Folk Arts

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